CBD To Oil Ratio

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Finding the Best CBD:THC Ratios and Products for Pain UPDATE: Starting in January 2022, Leaf411 transitioned to a schedule-based system for our nurse guidance calls. Visit our Services page at This printable cannabis flower to oil ratio guide will help you decide how much to use so you end up with a perfectly potent product.

Finding the Best CBD:THC Ratios and Products for Pain

UPDATE: Starting in January 2022, Leaf411 transitioned to a schedule-based system for our nurse guidance calls. Visit our Services page at this link to learn more.

How Different CBD:THC Ratios and Types of Products Can Help with Pain

Medically reviewed by Katherine Golden, RN
Written by Denise Rustning

When it comes to treating pain with cannabis, both the type of product and the ratio of cannabinoids matter. The two primary cannabinoids are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), though the cannabis plant contains many other cannabinoids, terpenes, plus other compounds that contribute to its therapeutic effect.

CBD: This cannabinoid is the star player in hemp products which are federally legal. CBD hemp products are required to have below 0.3% THC, which is such a small amount that it’s not intoxicating and won’t get you high. You’ll also find CBD in cannabis products that contain higher levels of THC.

THC: The cannabinoid responsible for the “high,” if used in large enough amounts. Cannabis products containing over 0.3% THC remain illegal at the federal level and can only be legally purchased in states that have legalized recreational or medical marijuana.

Understanding the roles that both CBD and THC play in managing pain can help you find the best product for your needs. If you need a quick refresher on the types of pain that CBD and THC work best on, check out our previous post here.

Timing Your Dose: How Different Cannabis Products Reduce Pain

Whether you’re looking at CBD hemp or cannabis containing higher levels of THC (sold legally in dispensaries), you have several different routes of administration to choose between :

  • Inhalation (smoking, vaping): Takes effect immediately and lasts 2-4 hours. This is a great choice for instant relief and for treating breakthrough pain (a flare-up in pain when you’re already taking longer-acting cannabis products). You can also layer inhaled cannabis with a longer-acting method (more on layering below) to help get you through the night.
  • Transdermal (patches, gels): Extended release option that takes effect quickly, since the cannabinoids are absorbed directly into your bloodstream. The time of onset is rapid, sometimes within 20 minutes. Transdermal products provide a consistent dose of medicine for up to 12 hours. The transdermal patch or gel is used on an area where the veins are near the skin’s surface—like the inside of your wrist or on your ankle.
  • Sublingual (placed under the tongue): Sublingual administration can provide rapid relief, but there are few true oromucosal (sublingual) products on the market. Cannabinoids are fat-soluble and, in their natural state, do not absorb well into the oral mucosa. Moreover, cannabis products are often extracted into oils, and these products are not water-soluble. Patients often expect rapid onset when using tinctures, only to wait 1-3 hours for the dose to take effect. Many products marketed as tinctures will end up being swallowed and absorbed via the digestive system, regardless of how long they are held under the tongue. A true sublingual (a product in which the cannabinoids are formulated to be more water-soluble) absorbs rapidly into the mouth. The effects can be perceived in 15-20 minutes and can last 4-6 hours.
  • Edibles (gummies, capsules): Edibles take effect in between 30 minutes and 2 hours. You’ll feel their effects between 5-8 hours. They provide a discreet, portable long-acting option.
  • Topicals (creams, salves): Topicals provide short-term localized relief. They can take effect within minutes, and may last for up to an hour.

Understanding CBD:THC Ratios

Most marijuana flower sold at legal dispensaries is THC-dominant, with very little CBD. Of course there are exceptions, such as The Wife strain or even some CBD hemp flower strains. However, odds are that if you’re using flower, you won’t find ratios connected to the strain.

Once you start looking at other cannabis products, including vapes, you’ll notice ratios on many—but not all—product labels. Common ratios include 1:1, 5:1, 10:1, and even 20:1. What do these numbers mean? And how do they help with your pain?

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The ratio indicates the amount of CBD compared to the amount of THC.

  • A 1:1 ratio is when the amount of CBD and THC are the same in each dose.
  • On the other hand, if a product has a 5:1 ratio, that means there’s five times as much CBD as THC in each dose.

It’s important to note that the ratio is not the same as the amount of CBD and THC. Our supporting member 1906 makes several different products, including their Midnight drops and Genius drops, that are designed to be swallowed. The ratio of each of these recreational products is 1:1—but the amount of CBD and THC in each is different.

  • The 1906 Midnight 1:1 drops have 5 mg of CBD and 5 mg of THC per dose.
  • The 1906 Genius drops are also a 1:1 ratio; however, they have 2.5 mg each of CBD and THC.

What if a product doesn’t list a ratio? In that case, look closely at the product label. The chances are good that the product either contains all CBD, with little or no THC (legal CBD hemp products fall in this category), or the product contains all THC.

What’s the Best CBD:THC Ratio For Your Pain?

The CBD and THC cannabinoids work individually to target different types of pain. By combining them in different ratios, though, you can achieve different effects to fit your specific needs.

While everyone is different, the following guidelines work for most people:

1:1 – Equal amounts of THC and CBD. A good option to try for all kinds of pain, including neuropathic pain. Products with a 1:1 ratio can be uplifting but this ratio will most likely cause impairment if using the suggested serving size. Always start low, go slow, to avoid intoxicating effects.

2:1, 4:1, 5:1 – A balanced product that can provide optimized levels of both CBD and THC for medicinal use, based on the fact that higher doses of CBD are often needed for relief. Can be intoxicating.

10:1 – A high CBD alternative for people who find the 5:1 ratio to be too intoxicating.

20:1 – High CBD levels along with very low THC levels provide a good option for managing inflammation pain. Very rarely intoxicating.

Leaf411’s supporting members offer many different CBD:THC ratios to meet different needs.

Be sure to closely look at the product label to make sure you understand the ratio! While it’s not as common, some manufacturers state the ratio reflecting the THC first and the CBD content second, like our member incredibles 10:1 THC:CBD tincture.

Layering Different Cannabis Products

Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night when your pain medication wore off, and suffered as you re-dosed and waited for the medicine to kick in? Fortunately, with CBD and THC products, you can layer different product types to reduce the changes of this happening.

For example, you might use a shorter-acting sublingual pill or vape to bring instant relief, together with an edible or transdermal patch to get you through the night.

If you’re using products containing THC (the cannabinoid that can be intoxicating and make you feel “high”), you’ll want to be careful with your dosing to make sure you don’t get end up with too much THC. The best approach is to start low and slow.

While you cannot overdose on THC, the feeling of being “too high” can be uncomfortable. Our website provides tips for what to do if you feel too high.

Cannabis as an Adjunct Therapy

Depending on how you use cannabis and other medications, there can be possible medication interactions. Our Leaf411 library offers guidance on specific medication interactions here.

We recommend consulting with a clinician before combining cannabis (which includes CBD hemp products!) with pharmaceuticals or over-the-counter pain medications.

Our Leaf411 cannabis-trained registered nurses can help with questions specific to medications you’re taking, and our service is FREE! Call us at 844-LEAF411 (844-532-3411).

We’re Here to Help!

We realize that it can feel overwhelming when researching cannabis for pain. There are so many options—different types of products and different ratios.

Research on cannabis as a safe alternative for treating pain continues to grow. As nurses, we’ve heard and seen firsthand the power of this plant-based medicine, and we stay up-to-date on the latest findings and clinical guidelines for using cannabis for pain.

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Our Leaf411 hotline nurses have both specialized training and experience helping people to find the best option for their particular situation. We’d love to share our expertise with you as well! Reach out to us on our free, anonymous hotline at at 844-LEAF411 (844-532-3411).

The Leaf411 cannabis nurse hotline provides free, anonymous education and directional support to the general public about the safe use of legal cannabis. We partner with select business members who meet our rigorous standards to extend our education and outreach efforts.

Cannabis Flower-to-Oil Ratio Guide & Printable Chart

Published: Nov 9, 2021 · Modified: Sep 4, 2022 by Emily Kyle · This post may contain affiliate links, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Are you ready to make cannabis butter or oil but are stuck wondering how much to use? This cannabis flower-to-oil ratio guide will help you decide how much so you end up with a perfectly-potent end product suited to your tolerance and needs.

Features

  • An easy-to-use guide to determine how much flower, kief, or trim and how much oil or butter to use in your infusions
  • Expert tips to help you determine your tolerance level
  • An option to download and print both the 1:1 and 1:2 chart

Why You Will Love This Guide

Edibles are a great way to consume cannabis to find relief from unwanted symptoms, but if you’re buying them from a dispensary, the costs can add up.

That’s why so many of my Well With Cannabis Community members love to save money by making edibles at home.

This can be done with a simple infusion of cannabis flower and fat like butter, coconut oil, or olive oil.

But the same question is always asked, how much cannabis and oil should I use?

It’s a great question because how much of each you decide to use will impact the potency of your final product.

This guide will discuss how you can determine the perfect flower-to-oil ratio for your infusion so you can get your chill on and save money simultaneously!

How to Use The Ratio Chart

The easy-to-use chart above will help you decide how much flower and oil to use based on how big you want your final batch to be.

This works for infusions that are made in a crockpot, Instant pot, or even an infusion machine, depending on the capacity it can hold.

The chart has two parts, a 1:2 ratio (1 ounce to 2 cups) and a 1:1 ratio (1 ounce to 1 cup).

But which chart should you use?

One of the best parts about making cannabis infusions is that you can make them as strong or mild as you prefer.

If you have a low tolerance or are looking for a mild dose, you should use the 1:2 ratio chart listed first.

If you have a high tolerance or are looking for a stronger dose, you can reference the second chart and use a 1:1 ratio.

For a 1:1 example, one ounce of decarboxylated flower will be mixed with one cup of butter.

This will create an infusion twice as potent as if you were to use the 1:2 ratio.

When deciding which ratio to pick, consider your tolerance, and if you’re new to edibles, be sure to follow the golden rule of “start low and go slow.”

Other Factors to Consider

As a general rule, it’s essential to know that the more cannabis flower you add to your infusion, the more potent your edibles will be.

You can also increase the potency by decreasing the amount of oil or butter to get the same effect.

My flower-to-oil ratio chart above breaks it down so you can easily and accurately mix the right amounts – but there are a few other factors to consider as well.

The Potency Of The Flower

While the amount of flower and oil you use matters, so does the potency of the flower you’re using.

Cannabis flowers can contain anywhere between 0-30% cannabinoids or the important compounds we want like CBD, CBG, and THC.

Different strains can have different percentages of cannabinoids. Without lab testing, it is impossible to know this exact number.

If you purchased cannabis from a dispensary, it should come with a lab report or printed number stating the total percent of cannabinoids in the product.

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If you grew your flower and know the strain you used, online resources like Leafly should be able to give you an average percentage of what the strain typically produces.

Remember, the higher the percentage of cannabinoids, the more potent the final infusion will be.

If You’re Working With Trim

The chart above is was designed with the thought that you would be using traditional cannabis flower buds.

But what if you want to make an infusion with trim or shake?

If you’re working with trim, I typically recommend you double the amount of “flower” in the cart.

This is because trim, like fan leaves or sugar leaves, is typically less potent than flowers, so doubling up on the amount will help keep the potency higher.

Of course, this is just a rough guesstimate, and will again depend on the strength of the flower and your personal tolerance.

If You’re Working With Kief

Again, the chart above is was designed for using cannabis flower buds.

However, if you’re lucky enough to have collected a nice amount of kief, you can easily infuse it into butter or oil.

If you’re working with kief, I typically recommend you *at least* halve the amount of “flower” in the cart.

This is because kief has the potential to be anywhere between 50-70% more potent than traditional cannabis flower due to its high trichome content.

Take care when preparing a kief oil or kief butter, as they can be very potent depending on how they are made.

A Calculator Can Help

While it is no substitute for lab testing, an online calculator can help you determine the potency of your final product.

For this to work, you will need to know the potency of the material you are working with or at least have a general idea.

You can input values into my edibles dosage calculator and see the final potency before infusing.

Get To Know Your Tolerance

By changing the amount of flower to oil in your recipe, you can manipulate the final product to be as potent as you’d like.

The more flower you use, the more potent it will be. The more oil you use, the more you will dilute the infusion.

Since cannabis affects everyone differently and the endocannabinoid system is highly individualized from person to person, it’s essential to know your tolerance level.

Cannabis enthusiasts agree that the best way to consume THC edibles safely is to “start low and go slow.”

That way, you are less likely to experience the unpleasant side effects of too much THC consumption, like anxiety and paranoia.

It’s always advised to start with a low flower-to-oil ratio for your first batch of edibles and see whether it meets your needs.

If it’s not as potent as you’d like, you can try a stronger ratio next time.

To find the perfect ratio for your tolerance level, keep experimenting with different amounts of cannabis flower and oil.

Once you’ve got the right potency, you’ll be able to make all kinds of edible recipes at home on your own.

Traditionally, cannabis brownies are a fan favorite, but you can make anything from cookies and candies to no-bake edibles and more with your infusions.

Whether you’re just beginning your journey into homemade cannabis-infused treats, or if you’re a seasoned baker, this flower-to-oil ratio chart will help as a quick guide.

Looking For More Support?

Join thousands of members inside my private Well With Cannabis Community to ask questions, find support, and share your edible creations!

Want To Make This Easier? Use A Machine!

If the process of decarbing and infusing feels like too much work, an all-in-one countertop device may be a perfect all-in-one solution.

My personal favorites? The LEVO and Ardent FX, but you can review the most popular infusion machines here.

Want A Discount Code?

My Edibles Made Easy Online Cooking Course will teach you how to easily make cannabis edibles and topical recipes at home. This step-by-step video course will teach you how to infuse, extract, and create edibles with many different product types – all from the comfort of your own home.

Learn more and enroll today →

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