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dill seed vs dill weed for pickles

Fresh dill weed is a popular complement to fish but can also be a pleasant addition to potato salad. Like the dill seed, dill weed works well with legumes but it is also enjoyable in coleslaw and is useful for flavoring dips. You can even use the seeds and the leaves of the dill plant together in some salad dressings and vinegars.

The dill plant is versatile in that you can use both the leaves and the seeds to provide flavor. “Dill weed” is the term used for the leaves; you can use them as an herb and use the seeds as a spice. Both forms of dill are essential for your spice collection as they are both popular ingredients in a number of different cuisines from all over the world. If you have encountered one or both forms of dill in your local supermarket, you may have wondered if there are any differences between the two. Do they have the same flavor? Can you use one in place of the other? Our Spiceography Showdown will provide you with answers.

Like many herbs, the seeds and the leaves do have some similarities but they are not identical. The flavor of dill leaves is similar to that of parsley and anise with notes of lemon. While dill seeds do have the same notes of anise, they also have notes of caraway. The seeds’ flavor is more pungent and some cooks even consider it slightly bitter and reminiscent of camphor; on the other hand, the leaves’ flavor is more delicate. In addition to all that, dill seeds have a characteristic not found in dill weed: their flavor tends to become stronger when heated.

How are dill seeds and dill weed used differently in the kitchen?

Because of the flavor differences, the seeds and leaves of the dill plant are not ideal replacements for each other; however, it is possible in a pinch. Keep in mind that you will need to use different amounts when substituting one for the other. Three heads of dill weed is roughly equivalent to a single tablespoon of the seeds. In addition, bear in mind that the seeds stand up to longer cooking times better than the leaves. This means that if you are using dill weed in place of the seeds, it is best to add them towards the end of the cooking time rather than at the beginning.

When making substitutions, you should also consider the difference in appearance between the seeds and the leaves. Some people find the appearance of dill weed in pickle brine to be unappetizing. If you are using dill weed instead dill seeds to flavor your pickles, you may want to chop it finely to make it less noticeable.

In the United States, the most well known use of dill seeds is as the main flavoring in dill pickles; however, they are widely used in Indian, Eastern European and Scandinavian cuisines. Dill seeds are excellent when used in acidic dishes including pickled beets, carrots and even pickled fish. You can also add them to your lentil dal or use them with any other legume to aid digestion.

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In terms of storage, dill seed being a dry food product can be stored for a very long time in a simple jar. The jar just needs to be dry. It can be used even after six months and it will still have its original taste. In contrast, dill weed cannot be stored for a very long time. In fact, it requires refrigeration to stay fresh. It can be stored in a freezer for up to two months but that will be it.

In this article, you will learn everything you need to know about dill seed vs dill weed including what they are and the key differences between the two.

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a spice plant that has been cultivated in Asia for many centuries. It has also been popular in Europe for many years. Both the seeds and the leaves of this plant are used as ingredients in food preparation. And even though both ingredients come from the same plant, they each provide a unique taste.

Storage

This spice plant is said to be related to plants such as parsley, coriander, caraway, anise, and carrots. It is famous as a spice ingredient and as a health-giving food because it is rich in vitamins and trace minerals. It is also famous in Asia as a traditional medicine for cough, GIT problems, and flatulence.

In terms of taste, dill weed can be used fresh or when dry. When fresh, it can be mixed with cheese or soup. The weed/leaves taste like a mix of lemon, parsley, and a sprinkling of anise. In contrast, dill seeds taste different. They taste like caraway. So dill weed and dill seed taste different despite coming from the same plant.

Several studies have revealed that dill can help in the management of diabetes.

Because dill weed and dill seed are so different in terms of taste, it is not recommended to swap one for the other when preparing a meal using a recipe. If you do this, you could end up with a meal that is not interesting or tasty.

Dill prefers full sun in well-drained soil. It grows easily from seed in U. S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8 through 10. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep in loose soil in the early spring. Make successive sowings every two to three weeks for a continuous supply. Successive sowings allow you to let the early plants mature so you can use the seeds when cucumbers are ready to pickle. Later plantings give you a supply of fresh dill weed throughout the season. In desert areas, plant dill in late summer and early fall to avoid extreme heat. Water newly planted dill to aid germination, and irrigate occasionally throughout the season to keep the soil from completely drying out. As seedlings grow, thin them to stand about 18 inches apart. An easy way to grow dill is to allow it to reseed directly in the garden.

Wash fresh dill weed and drain it dry, chop it, then freeze it in small containers or freeze it flat on a baking sheet to transfer to small containers. To dry dill weed, loosely tie together a few branches at the base with string or a rubber band and hang the bundles upside-down in an airy location out of direct sun. Bruising the branches can cause spots of decay or mold, so handle the dill gently. You can also use an electric dehydrator to dry dill weed quickly. A dehydrator helps the dried leaves retain the bright green color of fresh dill.

Growing

Common dill (Anethum graveolens) has naturalized in North America after its introduction from its native southwestern Asia. Dill is easy to grow, lending textural visual interest to the garden with its 3- to 4-ft tall, feathery foliage and 6-inch wide umbrels of bright yellow flowers. Dill foliage is food for black swallowtail caterpillars, so it is recommended as a host plant in butterfly gardens. But dill really shines in the kitchen. The sweetly pungent flavor is concentrated in both the leaves and the seeds, making dill a popular herb for a wide range of culinary uses. Dill weed is simply another name for dill foliage.

Harvest dill seeds from mature plants after the flowers set seeds. The flower umbrels become clusters of seeds that cling to the plant until they are completely mature. Snip off the seed heads when the seeds are brownish and dry before the seeds scatter. Hold a bag or large bowl under the heads and snip – let the seed heads drop into the container.

Young dill plants that you thin from the garden are ideal to chop for tender, fresh dill weed. Although you can trim dill foliage at any time to use fresh, the leaves have the best flavor just before the umbrels bloom. Trimmed dill continues to grow new leaves until the plant blooms, so you can repeat harvest the foliage.