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does smoking weed seeds kill sperm cells

What’s more, they can damage sperm cells’ DNA cargo. And cigarettes can do their damage even if guys themselves don’t smoke. The sons of mothers who smoke have poorer sperm quality than sons of non-smoking moms.

istockphoto You might not be able to break or sprain a testicle, but testicles can be “twisted.”

Hot, Hot, Hot

There isn’t a lot of research on how much is too much, but one 2007 study found that regularly taking a hot bath or jacuzzi can hurt fertility, albeit temporarily.

istockphoto Heat puts the hurt on sperm and sperm production.

Of course, there are many babies born to men that take baths and use laptops, so the jury is still out.

“What we have found is that the effects of cannabis use on males and their reproductive health are not completely null, in that there’s something about cannabis use that affects the genetic profile in sperm,” Scott Kollins, a senior author of the study, said in a statement.

This factor is important because if fewer sperm are present in a person’s semen, there is a decreased chance that a sperm will reach an egg and fertilize it. According to the Mayo Clinic, a low sperm count or concentration means a person has fewer than 15 million sperm per milliliter of semen. To determine a person’s sperm count, doctors must look at semen under a microscope on two separate occasions for accuracy purposes, the Mayo Clinic explained.

Sperm concentration affects a person’s ability to conceive, so a lower concentration could make it more difficult to have a child

Sperm concentration, along with other factors like sperm motility and testosterone levels, can affect a person’s ability to conceive a child, according to the Mayo Clinic. So the study’s findings suggest a person who uses cannabis may have more difficulty conceiving than someone who does not use cannabis.

The small study, which looked at the sperm of 37 men who either used or did not use cannabis, concluded that use of the substance can significantly change a person’s sperm concentration. The study also looked at how cannabis use affected ejaculation, semen volume, semen pH, and motility, and found that the substance did not create a significant change in these categories.

Since sperm concentration can greatly affect a person’s reproductive abilities, the study’s authors also looked at the potential for this trait to be passed from a cannabis user down to their offspring. Based on previous studies about cigarette smokers’ ability to pass on certain traits, they found that there is a chance cannabis users who have genetically-changed sperm might cause their children to also have genetically changed sperm.

Society President Rebecca Sokol says the study confirms previous studies that found a possible but not proven link between abnormal semen and sperm function and the use of cannabis. But she warns that the study does not have enough cases to draw definite conclusions.

"There is a widespread and growing perception among not only youth, but the public in general, that marijuana is a relatively harmless drug, and it has been difficult marshaling science to correct this perception," Volkov said. "The science of marijuana is far from settled, and this has allowed advocates of various positions to cherry-pick evidence to support their particular stance."

Another paper on the health consequences of cannabis was published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and a team of the institute's researchers prepared a paper detailing the risks based on the strongest scientific evidence currently available. According to the paper, they wanted to dispel "the popular notion that marijuana is a harmless pleasure" and does not need to be regulated.

A third of all infertility cases are linked to the male partner, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (PDF). The society says marijuana is associated with impaired sperm function and should not be used by men trying to conceive.

The researchers also wrote about the harmful effects of cannabis use on brain development, especially in kids and teenagers. Preliminary research shows that adolescents who are early-onset smokers are slower at tasks, have lower IQs later in life and have an increased incidence of psychotic disorders.