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how to germinate weed seeds with paper towel

Transporting your seeds can be a pain as they’re so sensitive. With paper towels, once your seeds start to sprout you need to transfer them into some soil, this is the only thing I prefer about the soil method, no transferring! They’re the only two drawbacks in my opinion though, so let’s take a look at germinating seeds in soil.

Peat moss is ideal for sprouting seeds. If you decide to germinate them with this material then you have no need to transport them. Ensure that you leave the peat moss loose around the seed so it can easily reach the surface.

How Long Does It Take To Germinate Seeds On A Paper Towel?

If you’re looking for somewhere to get your own seeds or samples, then I can highly recommend Seeds Now, they’ve been supplying me all my seeds for a few years now.

To be quite frank, there’s not much positive about starting them in soil in my opinion. The main benefits are that it’s a natural environment for your seedlings, but as with any natural environment it’s not the most sterile place. With that in mind, here’s the first drawback. Without a sterile environment, there’s always a chance that your seeds will become damaged by pathogens in the soil before they’ve even begun to sprout.

One of the my favourite childhood memories from school is a science project. What was that science project? Germinating seeds on a paper towel. It was cress to be exact. Little did I know at the time how often I’d end up following this method during adulthood, with more success than my adolescent attempts!
Anyway, I’ve written up my exact method so you can sprout seeds on paper towels just like I did in my childhood, with a few tweaks improving the method. But before that, let’s check out why I usually opt for the paper towel method over sprouting them in soil.

You don’t want to load your plate up with tons of paper towels, but it’s nice to have several sheets so they can hold plenty of water. If necessary, fold or cut the paper towels to size so everything fits completely inside the plate. If a paper towel is sticking outside the plates, everything will dry out quickly.

Once seeds have germinated, gently pull off the top paper towel to reveal the seedlings underneath.

Supplies

Add enough water that all the Rapid Rooters appear dark, but not shiny from too much water. Once you’re done, put the trays back on the seedling mat. Young seedlings love warmth!

If the seedling has already lost the shell, place the leaves close to the top. These seedlings often grow the fastest.

Helpful Tool: Pointy tweezers (though most tweezers will work in a pinch)

You can also germinate your seeds by placing them in water. It’s slightly faster than the soil method, but you need to adjust your environmental factors accordingly. Remember, successfully germinating seeds requires a perfect balance of ideal growing conditions. When germinating in water, seeds need only 24-48 hours to pop their stems, though cultivators can keep them soaking for up to a week as needed. Water germination is faster because the seed gets all the moisture it needs immediately, and the shell softens and cracks more easily after soaking.

Germination is the first stage of the cannabis growth cycle : the process that brings a cannabis seed out of its hibernation period and starts the cannabis growth process. After all, seeds in a bag don’t spontaneously start developing roots. Also known as “popping” seeds, seed germination begins when a seed receives environmental cues letting it know the setting is perfect to start growth.

Use a spray bottle to moisten the paper towels and then store the cushioned seeds between two plates, under a face-down bowl, or gently place them in a plastic bag. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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While many plants can be germinated in the ground, cannabis seeds are fragile enough that you should germinate them before planting.

Germination is the process that brings a cannabis seed out of its hibernation period and starts the cannabis growth process. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

Lay one paper towel on top of a countertop, place a few seeds, and cover them with a second paper towel. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

The paper towel method also has its risk, as the fragile seedlings can be damaged during the potting process. The tiny roots can also get tangled in the paper towels, so make sure to move the seeds to potting soil before roots grow too long. Use your hands or tweezers to gently remove each seed from the paper towels and place them in a prepared growing medium.