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how to incubate seeds

Place seed-starting containers on the bottom of an incubator. Foam cups, peat pots or multiple-cell trays can be used as seed-starting containers.

Fill the water tray in the incubator and keep it filled if you use a chicken egg incubator to germinate the seeds.

Water the seed starter lightly, moistening it with water from a spray bottle. The seed starter should be moist but not soggy. Keep it moist until seedlings emerge.

Check the seeds daily for germination. Many kinds of seeds germinate within seven to 10 days, but seeds of some perennials and herbs may take 21 or more days to germinate. Refer to the seed packet or product description to determine the expected days to germination for your specific seeds.

Plant seeds at the planting depth specified on their packet or label, and cover them with the seed starter. Seeds usually are planted no deeper than their diameter, according to an Organic Gardening website article. Plant tomato and pepper seeds at a depth of 1/4 inch.

Reply 4 years ago

That’s all for now,
Moderator

Step 5: Put in the Tray

very good guide i like it.
Thank you

Reply 4 years ago

Hey! Thanks a lot! I will be doing a desing practice on biology lab about germination soon and decided to use temperature as the variable but i was struggling on how to control de temperature.. GENIOUS! After planting the seeds you just water them on top.. right? Thanks (:

Many seeds are simple to grow. Scratch up a patch of open soil, scatter the seeds, and there you go. But other seeds will do best under more controlled conditions, or with special treatment that mimics the conditions of their native habitats.

On the other hand, more extreme treatment may be necessary to get the most out of wildflowers from hot places. In the Southwest, it can be fire that turns the key. I had a lot of trouble getting Texas bluebonnets (Lupinus texensis) to sprout with abandon until one year when a kitchen fire scorched an envelope of seeds. That’s the end of them, I thought, tossing the charred seeds out on the bank. Naturally, every last one sprouted into a vigorous, healthy plant.

Use these tricks to speed germination, then plant up some pots

When the pots are ready, I snip off a corner of the seed packet (or its interior glassine envelope of seeds) and carefully shake three or four seeds into each pot, allowing at least ½ inch between each of them. The tiniest seeds can slide out too quickly so, for better control, I fold a small piece of stiff white paper in half, pour the seeds into the strip, and dole them out by lightly tapping the paper strip. If the seeds are large enough to easily see, I use my fingertip (making sure it’s dry so seeds don’t adhere to it) to push each seed gently against the moist, soilless mix, so it makes good contact. Instead of burying the seeds, I use a sieve to cover them with a thin layer of the reserved seed-starting mix. If the seeds require light to germinate, I don’t cover them at all. I then make a label with the plant’s name and date, and push the marker into the pot so that it doesn’t protrude above the rim.

Rough and tumble treatment is just right for seeds with a tough coat. Put them in a jar lined with coarse sandpaper, cover, and shake.

Columbines brighten both sides of my shady, front-yard path. The little congregation on one side came as plants from a catalog, while those on the other were nurtured, by me, from a palmful of shiny, black seeds to a drift of long-spurred flowers. Guess which ones give me the most satisfaction? Maternal pride isn’t the only reward that I get from starting seeds. I’ve also gained a greener thumb and a fatter wallet—a packet of seeds provides 20 or more plants for the price of a single potted plant. Learn more: 8 Ways to Save Money at the Garden Center