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male weed seeds vs female

Females are the prizes of cannabis plants—they are the ones that grow the buds that we all know and love. Anytime you see a picture of a cannabis plant with buds, you are looking at a female plant.

A cola, also called a “bud site,” refers to a cluster of buds that grow tightly together. While smaller colas occur along the budding sites of lower branches, the main cola—sometimes called the apical bud—forms at the top of the plant.

A node is a point at which a branch grows off of the main stem, or one branch from another branch. Fan leaves and buds can grow on some nodes, but not necessarily all.

Trichomes

The rare hermaphroditic plant contains both female and male sex organs. These plants can sometimes self-pollinate, but this is typically bad as it will create buds with seeds and also pass on hermaphroditic genes.

Pre-flowers begin to develop four weeks into growth, but they may take a little longer depending on how quickly the sprouting phase occurs. By the sixth week, you should be able to find the pre-flowers and confidently determine the sex of your plant.

These are the first leaves to grow from the seed after germination. They usually come in pairs, and seeing them is a sign of successful germination and that your plant is on its way to growing healthy and strong.

The roots grow down from the main stalk of the plant into the soil. When growing from a seed, the main root is called the “taproot.” Roots are the lifelines of a cannabis plant, pulling water and oxygen into the plant so it can grow healthy and strong.

Some weed seeds also develop the sexual organs of the opposite sex. These are called hermaphrodites or “hermies.” Hermaphrodite female weed seeds develop staminate flowers or flowers that have stamens instead of pistils.

The sex of the male weed seeds or plants can be determined three weeks before the female weed seeds or plants which are planted at the same time. This is convenient since male weed seeds or plants must be harvested before they can pollinate the female seeds or plants and block their growth.

Female marijuana weed plants that have not been pollinated are called “sinsemilla” or “without seeds.” The flowers are allowed to grow and develop to produce the psychoactive chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

They can pollinate themselves as well as the other female weed plants. They tend to pass on their sexual dispositions to their offspring so they are best eradicated. The sex of weed plants can be affected by many factors. Environmental conditions, weed seed age, lunar stages, and chemicals are known to influence the sex of the plants.

When female weed seeds or plants start to flower, hairs develop in abundance at the ends of their ramifications. This is not present in male weed seeds or plants. Female weed seeds or plants also develop V-shaped pistils at their flowering stage.

Plants, like animals, have male and female varieties. The male plants produce pollen which pollinates the flowers of female plants. Flowers that have been pollinated produce seeds. Marijuana, or weed plants, are also either male or female.

Weed seeds and plants are cultivated for this chemical. Since only the female weed seeds produce it, growers only cultivate male weed seeds for breeding otherwise they are harvested early to keep them from pollinating the female weed plants.

While environmental factors may not necessarily determine the sex of marijuana plants or cannabis seeds, it is known that certain environments can change the sex of a plant.

One of the biggest myths of sexing cannabis seeds comes from a popular chart online.

Unfortunately, there’s not much truth to any of these interpretations. It’s simply impossible to tell just by looking at them what the sex of any cannabis seed is. If it was that easy, feminized marijuana seeds would not be as popular as they are. People could simply buy regular seeds and look at them themselves.

Common myths on identifying the sex of a cannabis seed

While it would be much easier for growers to be able to sex their cannabis seeds, the simple fact is that there’s no way to do it. However, sexing plants early on during their growth period is not only essential, it’s completely possible. Growers can even do it before their plants enter the flowering stage if needed. Then male plants can be removed and growers can enjoy a nice, full crop.

Research is carried out all the time to determine if a plant’s environment has anything to do with the sex it will turn out to be. And while there’s research stating that it does not, there’s just as much research stating that certain species do have their sex determined by the environment. This same research also states that using certain chemical treatments can also reverse the sex of a plant.

This has been a question that has become a very hot topic online these days. After a quick search, growers can find multiple charts and explanations on how to sex cannabis seeds.

MSNL Team / 3rd February 2017