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seeds in good weed

If you don’t like the flavor, effects, or even the look of the bud, then it’s probably not worth growing.

If growing outside, some growers prefer to germinate seeds inside because they are delicate in the beginning stages of growth. Indoors, you can give weed seedlings supplemental light to help them along, and then transplant them outside when big enough.

This is sometimes referred to as “cloning by seed” and will not produce any male plants. This is achieved through several methods:

Was the seed found in good weed?

Take four sheets of paper towels and soak them with distilled water. The towels should be soaked but shouldn’t have excess water running off.

One way to avoid sexing plants is to buy feminized seeds (more below), which ensures every seed you plant will be a bud-producing female.

If cannabis is legal in your state, you can buy seeds or clones from a local dispensary, or online through various seed banks.

Seeds can also form in plants with genetic disorders or instability, like hermaphrodites—plants that develop both male and female reproductive parts. Generally, stress and genetic disorders are viewed as bad, so temper expectations with any plant you start from a bagseed.

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed, but overall results seem to be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and often either the yields or quality isn’t as expected. The problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder, where each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency they’re supposed to.

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

There’s a seed in my bud!

Are seeds good to grow?

If it’s very seedy the buds may not feel as potent, though a few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency. The main problem with seedy weed is that you are getting less smokeable bud for the amount of total mass there. If it is seedless, you will get a lot more bang for your buck. Seedless bud (sinsemilla) is considered to be the highest quality and most potent type of weed.

Seeds are the result of pollination. That means the seedy cannabis buds (which come from a female plant) may have come into contact with pollen from a male plant. Therefore, it’s possible the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before the released pollen. It’s also possible that the plant self-pollinated (sometimes called herming) which is often the result of plant stress during the budding phase but can also be caused by genetics.

It should be dark and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds, that can be easily crushed between the fingers, usually won’t sprout. However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding them for hard seeds after all) so when in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts!

At first glance, fire herb should make you wish you already had a joint of it rolled up or a bowl packed. This is the weed that you’ll find on most cannabis Instagram pages. The green will pop through all the juicy trichomes. The buds should look like they were just removed from the plant, even though they have been drying and curing for the past few of weeks.

First of all, there is no way you can evaluate your weed solely from visual cues. You need to smoke, vape or eat it in order to reach a conclusion. But there are several things to look out for that might help you when you call your weedman. If you’re lucky enough to already live in a place where a legal framework is established, you won’t need this article as much. You’ll only need to distinguish the good from the really good bud. You’ll probably never have to experience low-quality cannabis ever again.

Good-quality cannabis will be super sticky. It should coat your grinder with a delicious, yet annoying, layer of resin (but hey, that’s the price you pay for your fire weed). This happens because of the gooey trichomes, not humidity. Although sticky, your nugs should be crisp and crunchy too. The grinding experience should be pleasant, not an arm exercise.

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A GOOD LOOK

Now here is the interesting checklist. Good-quality bud, which your friends refer to as “dank,” “sticky icky,” “fire,” or even “loud,” is what you should be looking for. Besides the exact opposite of the points mentioned above, there are many characteristics of good weed that will make you loved by the squad when bringing it to the next smoke sesh.

Potency does not equal quality. CBD-rich strains without THC won’t get you high, but can be of excellent quality and value. Remember to have clear guidelines on what you’re looking for. If you’re fortunate enough to be able to choose between indicas, sativas and hybrids, research these variations well. Learn all about them and the manifold strains within each group. You might be sold an indica when you actually asked for a sativa and end up disappointed on the effects, judging the strain. Be sure that you can trust your supplier – we can’t stress this enough.

There’s a seed in my bud!

It’s probably not your first time buying cannabis, so you’re familiar with the visual weight. If the dealer gives you more than you expected, it’s probably not because he/she wants to be your friend. This will be a very fluffy and loose marijuana. If the flower is lighter than usual, that is a sign of poor quality. Buds should be fat and dense. They should be hard to squeeze and make a crunchy sound when done so. Be sure to feel your bud like your grandmother feels fruit at the market. You can tell a lot by a nug’s consistency.