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sprout in pot

Cannabis is grown from one of two sources: a seed or a clone. Seeds carry genetic information from two parent plants and can express many different combinations of traits: some from the mother, some from the father, and some traits from both.

The main drawback to growing from seed is there is no guarantee as to what you’ll end up with—if you buy a regular pack of cannabis seeds, it will be a mix of males and females. You’ll need to sex them out (more below) to identify the males and get rid of them, because you don’t want your females producing seeds.

Cannabis seeds vs. clones

Most experienced or commercial growers will not use feminized seeds because they only contain one set of genes, and these should never be used for breeding purposes. However, a lot of beginning growers start with feminized seeds because they eliminate the worry of having to deal with male plants.

Another drawback to clones is they can take on negative traits from the mother plant as well. If the mother has a disease, attracts pests, or grows weak branches, its clones will probably have the same issues.

Check out Johanna’s full video series on how to grow weed on Leafly’s YouTube .

Brussels sprouts (Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera) resemble baby cabbages, all lined up in neat rows on the tall stalks. These plants naturally grow vertically without support, making them a suitable addition to a space-saving container garden. Brussels sprouts grow best in cool weather, and they may fail to form sprouts if it’s too hot. They take about 90 days to produce sprouts, so gardeners often plant them in early summer for a fall crop or in early spring so they can mature before the heat of summer.

Plant one brussels sprout seedling in the pot, setting it at the same depth it was growing at in its previous container. Place the pot in a location that receives full, all-day sunlight immediately after planting.

Things You Will Need

Dissolve 1 tablespoon of 15-30-15 soluble fertilizer in 1 gallon of water. Water the brussels sprouts with the solution every two weeks, beginning about six weeks after transplanting. Frequent watering leaches fertilizer from the container, so regular reapplications ensure the plant gets the necessary nutrients to produce well.

Feel the soil in the container at least once a day. Water when the top 1 inch of soil feels dry. Soil dries out more quickly in a container, and brussels sprouts may require daily watering during hot or dry weather.

Fill a 12-inch diameter, 12-inch deep pot with potting soil. Mix 1 1/2 tablespoons of 14-14-14 slow-release fertilizer into the potting mix. Water the soil until the excess moisture begins to drain from the bottom of the pot.

As for the material of the container, clay pots work well for brussel sprouts because they remain cool, drain well, and have decent air circulation.

Use an organic, good quality potting mix that is light and well-draining, and consider adding more compost to increase the fertility and humus.

4: Plant Brussel Sprout Seeds Inside

Yes in warmer climates, fall planting is preferred. You should be able to direct seed in mid-summer for a late fall or early winter harvest.

This has a super-strong stalk, and the sprouts are ideal for freezing. The average maturity date is 90-100 days.

That means you need to know the right location for your containers when to start the seeds and the right soil for your plants.