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weed with large seed pods

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Where It Grows: Sunny landscape and garden areas

Size: To 10 feet tall and 2 feet wide

15 of 34

Appearance: Quickweed has jagged, hairy leaves and small white daisy-shape flowers in summer.

Control: Mulch garden areas in spring to prevent pigweed or use a preemergence herbicide in spring. Pull weeds by hand or spray with a postemergence weed killer.

Control: Use a preemergence weed preventer ($26, Amazon) to prevent seeds from sprouting, pull plants by hand, or spot-treat with a nonselective herbicide if growing in sidewalk cracks or other places where nothing else is growing.

Type: Broadleaf annual

First up, weeds already going to seed or getting close. Catch them now before seeds disperse!

1. Top priority: eradicate before seeds disperse

Many garlic mustard plants in King County are going to seed. Note the long, skinny seed pods on this one.

Below are some of the top regulated noxious weeds to keep an eye out for this month. Please let us know if you see one of these high-priority invasive plants, so we can make sure they’re controlled or eradicated in time! [Click here to go to the King County Noxious Weed List for the whole list!] Report locations and share photos with us easily on our new and improved Report a Weed online form.

If you’ve made it outside on a recent sunny day, you’ve probably noticed the abundance of flowers blooming in gardens, parks, forests, and throughout King County right now. Unfortunately, the noxious weeds are out there, too—many of them bolting, flowering, and even going to seed already.

Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), a Class A noxious weed, is a biennial or winter annual herb, can self-pollinate to produce 62,000 seeds and overtake a relatively undisturbed forest understory. Eradicating it before seeds mature is key. You can identify garlic mustard by: