Posted on

weed with no seeds

Another way to prevent getting this page in the future is to use Privacy Pass. You may need to download version 2.0 now from the Chrome Web Store.

Completing the CAPTCHA proves you are a human and gives you temporary access to the web property.

If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware.

What can I do to prevent this in the future?

If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 67461f5e8b48fe38 • Your IP : 185.230.143.81 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

As knowledge spread that seedless cannabis flowers made for a far better product, growers started focusing on producing sinsemilla exclusively, culling male plants as soon as they could. If they required seeds for breeding, they kept the sexes strictly separated and only allowed pollination of select female plants in dedicated areas.

Pollinated female cannabis plants spend a lot of their energy on producing seeds. But unless you are a breeder and require the seeds, this is not what you want. Unfertilised females don’t produce seeds, but instead spend energy on producing resin. As such, seedless buds have higher levels of cannabinoids and aromatic substances—they are more potent and will taste better.

A little later, when indoor cultivation became popular, the separation of male and female cannabis plants became even easier and more commonplace. Growers could simply keep each in a separate grow room or tent to limit the risk of accidental pollination.

FEMINIZED CANNABIS: THE SINSEMILLA BREAKTHROUGH

Truth was, of course, that it was still the same weed from the same strains. The only difference was in how it was cultivated. What’s more, this alleged new kind of powerful cannabis fuelled anti-cannabis propaganda, as weed suddenly became more “dangerous” in the eyes of the establishment.

If you love cannabis, you’ve probably come across the word sinsemilla. Is sinsemilla some special kind of cannabis? Where does it come from? Read on to find out!

It is thought that the word sinsemilla was coined in the 1970s, around the time when cultivation started ramping up in the US and Europe. Here it was used to differentiate seedless weed from the poorer stock. As the “new” weed was indeed better and more potent, this gave rise to the misconception of sinsemilla being a different, very strong variety of cannabis.

Sinsemilla, as we explained, just describes bud without seeds. The word can be used for any type of female cannabis plant that wasn’t fertilised, regardless of the strain. As such, sinsemilla can be either indica or sativa.

The increase in the quality of weed is mainly down to legality and availability. However, cannabis cultivators have also learned more effective and efficient growing techniques.

In the past, weed was full of seeds making for a harsh smoking experience and relatively low THC.

Nowadays, high THC strains are common, so it is now a question of finding weed with the right aroma and taste.

Sinsemilla in the Modern Era

Popular strains such as Kush and Skunk have been around since the 1980s. Neville’s Haze was around in the 1970s and is just a single step removed from a landrace. Most experts now agree that there was premium weed 40+ years ago, but hardly anyone was fortunate enough to use it.

Modern marijuana consumers in America are a fortunate breed. Those who live in a state where marijuana is legal for recreational use now have the access that eluded previous generations.

Today, marijuana users are spoiled by a combination of easy access and extremely high-quality bud. Past generations relied on low-grade schwag illegally smuggled into the country. Today’s cannabis consumers can walk into a dispensary and buy the best weed they can afford.

A lot of people don’t seem to realize that terpenes don’t make sinsemilla taste sweet. What happens is that the aromatic compounds act as a trigger for association with sweet items we previously experienced.